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Public Lectures and Events at Queen Margaret

THE PROFESSORIAL LECTURES

Programme for 2008/9

The Professorial Lectures offer fresh angles on topics of relevance and are designed to appeal to a wide audience.

IF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY REALLY IS THE “BEST BUY” FOR PUBLIC HEALTH, WHY DO SO FEW “BUY IT”?
(by Tom Mercer, Professor of Clinical Exercise Physiology and Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences)

What are the actual health benefits of a physically active lifestyle? How much do I need to do? What is the least amount I can get away with? Why should I follow guidelines? Which guidelines should I follow?

In this lecture, Tom Mercer considers why so few people actually adopt and/or maintain a physically active lifestyle and explores whether “established” exercise/physical activity promotion recommendations are a help or a hindrance.

ACCOUNTABILITY: ENABLER OR INHIBITOR OF INNOVATION IN SCOTTISH PUBLIC SERVICES?
(by Eddie Frizzell, Professor of Public Service Management

What are the key elements of public sector reform in devolved Scotland? What does risk taking mean in public services, and can it ever match the reform rhetoric? What contribution does risk management make to the reform agenda? Is public accountability an enabler of, or an obstacle to, risk taking and reform?

Focusing on central government services, Eddie Frizzell reviews the public sector reform agenda since 1999, and asks whether developments in public accountability will help or hinder further reform.

When: Tuesday March 17, 5.30pm for 6pm
Where: Lecture Theatre 3148, University, Edinburgh 's new campus at Craighall, EH21 6UU

SUBTLE, EXOTIC, AND MYSTERIOUS: SCOTTISH ACCENTS AND THEIR VALUE TO SPEECH SCIENCE
(By James Scobbie, Professor of Speech Science)

In Linguistics, the way your neighbours talk can be as surprising and theoretically important as any source of data. This talk will exemplify the techniques which literally let us look into the mouths of speakers. Ultrasound, for example, reveals the way in which some Scottish speakers produce a covert articulation of a word-final "r" consonant. This and other phenomena provide a fascinating insight into the complex dance of articulation. Its fine control structures and social variability reveal the complexity of "normal" pronunciation.

When: Monday April 27, 5.30pm for 6pm
Where: Royal Society 2PQ

 

These lectures are free but ticketed.
To reserve a place, email Whighamask for Whigham.

 

USEFUL LINKS:

Public Lectures Archive

The Edinburgh Lectures Series

University, Edinburgh is proud to have joined the Edinburgh Lectures Series partnership.

The lectures are led by The City of Edinburgh Council and presented in partnership with The University of Edinburgh, Heriot-Watt University, Napier University, The Open University in Scotland, National Museums of Scotland, The Scottish Arts Council, Scottish Government, The Royal Society of Edinburgh as well as University.

Each series address's a range of major public issues in a national and international context. The 2008/09 series is titled Chinese Connections.

In the Chinese Connections programme, QMU and The City of Edinburgh Council are delighted to present:

It's not all black and white

A lecture on the giant panda

Date: Friday 27th March
Venue: The Hub, Castlehill
Time:
1.30pm
Speakers: David Windmill, Iain Valentine and Stephen Woodllard
Chair: Professor Alan Gilloran

The giant panda (Aliurapoda melanoleuca) elicits strong emotions from people around the world. Its image pulls on the heartstrings and the fragility of its existence in the mountainous bamboo forests of Sichuan province in China make it one of the most endangered species in the world. Only 1600 are thought to be left in the wild although the recent earthquake has put even that low number in doubt.
Because of this the Chinese government manages a substantial international programme for the conservation of giant pandas. Research into natural habitat restoration and both wild and captive populations are key areas of this programme. Recent success in artificial breeding has resulted in increased numbers of giant pandas to form a sound basis for future research and reintroductions to the wild.
For the Chinese nation the giant panda is an iconic image. It is not 'just another animal'. The gift of giant pandas to zoos outside China is a rare and important event, symbolic of friendship between the governments of the two countries. There must be a firm foundation of co-operation and understanding before such a gift is made.
There has been a long history of scientific co-operation between Scotland and China and by Edinburgh institutions in particular. The growth of China's influence on the world in the 21st century is accepted as fact. Conservation, global warming, biodiversity loss are also key issues for the 21st century and so it is important that the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland contributes to research in these areas. The arrival of giant pandas at Edinburgh Zoo will form a basis for this and for its interpretation to the public of Scotland and the rest of the UK.

Tickets can be purchased through The Edinburgh Lectures Series website.

For more information on the full series of lectures please go to:




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